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Nidhi Dugar Pens About India's Isolated Tribes In Her Book Titled 'White as Milk and Rice'

Published by Penfuin, 'White as Milk and Rice' weaves together prose, oral narratives and Adivasi history to tell the stories of six remarkable tribes of India that are reckoning with radical changes over the last century.

Nidhi Dugar Pens About India's Isolated Tribes In Her Book Titled 'White as Milk and Rice'
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The Maria girls from Bastar in Chhatisgarh practice coitus as an institution before marriage, but with rules-one may not sleep with a partner more than three times; the Hallaki women from the Konkan coast sing throughout the day in forests, fields, the market and at protests; the Kanjars of Rajashthan have plundered, looted and killed generation after generation and will show the reader how to roast a lizard when hungry.

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Notably, The Halakki tribes of Konkan are a sub-caste group of vokkaligas of Karnataka. They are found predominantly in Uttara Kannada district. Halakki Vokkaligas living in the foot of Western Ghats are known as the "Aboriginals of Uttara Kannada". Their way of living is still ancient. The women adorn themselves with beads and necklaces, heavy nose rings and distinctive attire.

The original inhabitants of India, these Adivasis still live in forests and hills, with religious beliefs, traditions and rituals so far removed from the rest of the country that they represent an anthropological wealth of their our heritage. This book weaves together prose, oral narratives and Adivasi history to tell the stories of six remarkable tribes of India that are reckoning with radical changes over the last century.

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Nidhi Dugar is a journalist and her stories have appeared in various national newspapers and magazines. She mostly writes on socio-cultural issues, documenting human lives and their journeys through various settings. Her first book The Lost Generation: Chronicling India's Dying Professions was released in 2016. She is a graduate of the School of Arts, City University in London and currently lives in Kolkata.

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