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Here's the secret behind the pink water body in Navi Mumbai

While the researchers are still unsure of what may have caused it, BNHS and independent microbiologists are speculating that the colour is from microscopic algae

Here's the secret behind the pink water body in Navi Mumbai
Photo Credits: Hindustan Times
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About a month ago, the number of flamingos that migrate every to the creek in Navi Mumbai had bolstered due to the lack of human activity owing to the lockdown. As the city was getting over the majestic pink-feathered birds, a water body in a part of the wetland has turned pink. The first-of-its-kind phenomenon amused the Mumbaikars as well as residents of MMR.

It is being said that it probably due to an explosive blooming of red algae that thrives in saline water, especially as the summer picks up and the wetland loses water. The deep pink water, located towards the south-eastern end of the wetland was not there till late last week.

The pink water has been identified by Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS) as a rare and first-of-its-kind occurrence for Mumbai Metropolitan Region. BHNS now plans to take samples of the water for study. While the researchers are still unsure of what may have caused it, BNHS and independent microbiologists are speculating that the colour is from microscopic algae.

Rahul Khot, the assistant director said that if it was a natural event, the pink water could have emerged due to vigorous growth of algae or bacteria. He added that beta-Carotene in these fungi or bacteria might be the reason behind the colouration to the water.

He also stated that the phenomenon could have been caused due to increased evaporation, salinity, and the current hot and humid weather conditions. According to Khot, the pink water body could maintain its colour for two weeks or till the onset of monsoon in the region. He said that with the arrival of monsoon, the salinity level in the water will go down and bring the water to its natural colour.

Divyashree Rai, the Public Relations Officer of BNHS said that Khot and his team are carrying out research but due to the lockdown, the process is taking longer than expected.

Earlier, a similar instance like the one in Navi Mumbai was recently witnessed across a massive stretch at the Edgars Creek in Melbourne, Australia, that started on May 10 and intensified subsequently.

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