Advertisement

SRA approves pre-monsoon works to begin in 107 slum projects across Mumbai

Though the authorities allowed pre-monsoon works to begin from April 26, the SRA staff and other officers will now receive passes to move around project areas.

SRA approves pre-monsoon works to begin in 107 slum projects across Mumbai
SHARES
Advertisement

The Slum Rehabilitation Authority (SRA) has now approved pre-monsoon works to begin in 107 slum projects in the city. This is despite the authorities allowing pre-monsoon works to begin in several areas of the city starting April 26. The SRA staff and other officers will apparently receive passes to move around project areas.

Deepak Kapoor, the CEO of SRA said, “Due to the coronavirus outbreak, the whole country was under a lockdown and not a single industry was functional. But to give a boost to the real estate industry and make sure construction sites don’t suffer losses during monsoon, the Authority is cooperating with developers and letting them complete their pre-monsoon work.”

“In all, 107 SRA schemes had applied for pre-monsoon repairs and works permission. In a record two weeks, we have granted approvals to all 107 schemes. Not a single case is pending. Work has been started by most developers on these schemes,” Kapoor added.

Read - BMC Plans To Go Aggressive In Tackling COVID-19 In Dharavi

A subsequent tweet by Kapoor mentioned that works had been allowed as Mumbai is almost on the verge of hitting monsoons. The Met department has predicted that southwest monsoons will reach the city by June 15-20. 

While this is good news ahead of the monsoons, it’s important for the workers of the SRA to be properly protected in order to avoid contracting the virus. This is crucial given that slum pockets are some of the worst affected by the coronavirus in Mumbai, with areas like Dharavi and Wadala reporting some of the highest cases. Unfortunately, many on the frontlines are also at risk as several civic workers have tested positive while conducting their duties.

Policemen, who are also the city’s primary line of defence, have been demonstrated to be extremely vulnerable to the virus given that they’re mostly involved with dispersing unruly crowds or assisting patients to and from health institutions. While protections have been improved for those at the frontlines, it seems like more stringent measures are required to make sure those fighting the virus are less likely to fall from it.

RELATED TOPICS